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Introduction to TIDA-010036 reference design

This section provide an overview of the TIDA-010036 reference design, which uses the ADS131M04 delta sigma standalone ADC for sensing the voltage and current necessary to calculate metrology parameters.  The TIDA-010036 design targets Class 0.5 single-phase two-wire meters with shunt current sensors and has a compact, magnetically immune cap-drop power supply to power the design from AC mains.

TIDA-010036 hardware design

This section provides an overview of the hardware used in the TIDA-010036 design, which includes the circuits used to translate the Mains voltage and current to the voltage waveform sensed by the ADS131M04.  In addition, it covers the TPS7A78-based cap-drop power supply used in this design.

Designing software for 1-phase electricity meters that use standalone ADCs

This section covers the initialization code and algorithms that can be used to calculate metrology parameters in a single-phase system using the sensed voltage and current samples.

ADS131M04 current detection mode for detecting neutral removal tampering

This section discusses current detection mode, which is a special low-power mode of the ADS131M04 standalone ADC, that can detect the presence of current when someone has tampered with a meter by removing its neutral connection.

Calibration and metrology accuracy results

This section discusses the procedure used to calibrate the TIDA-010037 design and the results obtained with this design.

Summary

In this section, a summary of the entire “How to design 1-phase shunt electricity meters using standalone metrology ADCs” training module would be covered.  Links will be provided for the reference designs that were discussed during this training series.

TI-RSLK MAX Module - 1 Running code on the LaunchPad using CCS

The purpose of this module is to learn software development methodology and understand how to set up an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), to then import and export Code Composer Studio (CCS) projects, as well as critical debugging information to understand the memory usage and performance of the software on the processor.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 2 – Voltage, current, and power

The purpose of this course is to review basic electronic components and the electrical properties needed to interface sensors and actuators to a microcontroller. You will learn how to measure reactance of a capacitor and use your project to measure current and voltage. The electrical properties of the capacitor will help you design circuits that “filter” or remove noise from your robot.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 3 – ARM Cortex M

This module serves as a brief introduction to the ARM Cortex-M microcontroller, assembly programming language and some debugging techniques. Understanding how the processor works is essential for the design of embedded systems, such as the one used in your robot.  

TI-RSLK MAX Module 4 – Software design using MSP432

This module is an introduction to C, a general-purpose programming language, in addition to the concepts of compiling and debugging using the MSP432 and TI Code Composer Studio™.  Debugging skills are a valuable tool when developing complex systems involved with robotics.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 5 – Building the robot

In this module, you will create the robot. You will then be able to measure the voltage, current and energy for a battery while managing voltage regulation. This will allow you to build the circuits needed to power the robot.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 6 – GPIO

In this module, you will interface a line sensor (infra-red sensor) to the microcontroller and learn how to write software to initialize GPIO pins.  The line sensor is a simple and accurate sensor for solving robotic challenges.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 7 – Finite state machines

This module will demonstrate how to use finite state machines as a central controller for the system. Finite state machines are an effective design process to have in your embedded system tool box and can be used to solve problems with inputs and outputs.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 8 – Interfacing input and output

The purpose of this module is to develop interface switches and an LED so the robot can effectively detect wall collisions. Many sensors and actuators deploy LEDs, so understanding how they operate will be important to building your robot.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 9 – SysTick timer

In this module, you will learn the fundamentals of SysTick timers and pulse width modulators (PWM), including how to measure pulse times and period with a logic analyzer and amplitude with an oscilloscope. It is important to understand the concept of PWM as we will use it to adjust power to the motors.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 10 – Debugging real-time systems-interrupts

This module provides an intro to how flash memory operates, including debugging techniques for real-time systems and how to generate periodic interrupts using SysTick. Minimally intrusive debugging is essential for real-time systems to evaluate performance while the system runs in real-life situations.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 11 – Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)

This module will show you how to display characters and provide real-time debugging on a display screen. An LCD or OLED on your robot provides a convenient way to observe what it is thinking.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 12 – DC motors

The purpose of this lab is to interface the motors to the TI LaunchPad to make the robot move. Understanding how duty cycle, voltage and current combine to affect speed is required when building your robot.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 13 – Timers

In this module, you will write software that uses the timers to create PWM outputs. Using timers for PWM and period interrupts provide mechanisms to grow the complexity of the robot system.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 14 – Real-time systems

This module demonstrates how to use priority interrupts for creating real-time systems.  As your robot system becomes more complex, period interrupts are one way to combine multiple threads onto one microcontroller.

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