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TI-RSLK MAX Module 15 – Data acquisition systems

This module will teach you how to interface the infrared distance sensors using the analog-to-digital converter. IR distance sensors are an essential component for solving robot challenges where avoiding walls is necessary to achieve the goal.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 16 – Tachometer

In this module, you will learn how to interface the tachometers that enable the robot to measure motor rotational speed. Tachometer data allows your software to drive straight, drive for a prescribed amount of distance or turn at a prescribed angle.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 17 – Control systems

The purpose of this module is to create a control system by combining the sensors with the actuators. Incremental and integral control are simple algorithms for controlling motor speed.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 18 – Serial communication

The purpose of this module is to understand the operation and use of first in first out (FIFO) queue to interface the robot to the PC using a serial channel. You will create two FIFO queues and design a command interpreter to assist in the robot challenge. You will develop an interrupting device driver using the universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART). This serial port allows the microcontroller to communicate with devices such as other computers, input sensors, and output displays.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 19 – Bluetooth low energy

The purpose of this module is to understand basic concepts of Bluetooth® low energy (BLE). You will interface the TI SimpleLink™ BLE CC2650 Module BoosterPack™ Plug-in module to the SimpleLink MSP432P401R LaunchPad™ development kit using universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) communication. You will create a BLE service with multiple characteristics and design a robot system that can be controlled by a smart device using BLE.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 20 – Wi-Fi

In this module, you will learn how to develop a set of Wi-Fi communication functions and learn how to interact with web services. By using the CC3100 to communicate with the MSP432, you will interface a Wi-Fi radio module to the microcontroller.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 7 – Finite state machines

This module will demonstrate how to use finite state machines as a central controller for the system. Finite state machines are an effective design process to have in your embedded system tool box and can be used to solve problems with inputs and outputs.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 9 – SysTick timer

In this module, you will learn the fundamentals of SysTick timers and pulse width modulators (PWM), including how to measure pulse times and period with a logic analyzer and amplitude with an oscilloscope. It is important to understand the concept of PWM as we will use it to adjust power to the motors.

TI-RSLK MAX Module 13 – Timers

In this module, you will write software that uses the timers to create PWM outputs. Using timers for PWM and period interrupts provide mechanisms to grow the complexity of the robot system.

From Zero to Hero: Time-of-Flight Training (ToF) Series

Technology overview

Learn about the advantages and tradeoffs between optical and ToF technologies and how to select the right distance and range-sensing technology to meet your system needs.
From Zero to Hero: Time-of-Flight Training (ToF) Series

Tools training

Learn about the tools and resources TI provides to help you prototype easier and faster.

Current sensor and metrology architecture options

This section compares two types of current sensors used in electricity meters: current transformers and shunts.  In addition, it discusses three different architectures for sensing the voltage and current samples used to calculate the metrology parameters.  These architectures include a SoC-based architecture, AFE-based architecture, and ADC-based architecture.

Introduction to TIDA-010037 reference design

This section provides an overview of the TIDA-010037 reference design, which uses the ADS131M04 delta sigma standalone ADC for sensing the voltage and current necessary to calculate metrology parameters.  The TIDA-010037 design targets Class 0.1 split-phase current transformer meters.

TIDA-010037 hardware design

This section provides an overview of the hardware used in the TIDA-010037 design, which includes information on the eFuse circuit used to create a current limited rail for connection to an external communication module.  In addition, this section discusses the circuits used to translate the Mains voltage and current to the voltage waveform sensed by the ADS131M04.

Designing software for split-phase electricity meters that use standalone ADCs

This section covers the initialization code and algorithms that can be used to calculate metrology parameters in a split-phase system using the sensed voltage and current samples

Calibration and metrology accuracy results

This section discusses the procedure used to calibrate the TIDA-010037 design and the results obtained with this design.

Summary

In this section, a summary of the entire “How to design high-accuracy CT-based split-phase electricity meters using standalone metrology ADCs” training module would be covered.  Links will be provided for the reference designs that were discussed during this training series.

Current sensor and metrology architecture options

This section compares two types of current sensors used in electricity meters: current transformers and shunts.  In addition, it discusses three different architectures for sensing the voltage and current samples used to calculate the metrology parameters.  These architectures include a SoC-based architecture, AFE-based architecture, and ADC-based architecture.

Introduction to TIDA-010036 reference design

This section provide an overview of the TIDA-010036 reference design, which uses the ADS131M04 delta sigma standalone ADC for sensing the voltage and current necessary to calculate metrology parameters.  The TIDA-010036 design targets Class 0.5 single-phase two-wire meters with shunt current sensors and has a compact, magnetically immune cap-drop power supply to power the design from AC mains.

TIDA-010036 hardware design

This section provides an overview of the hardware used in the TIDA-010036 design, which includes the circuits used to translate the Mains voltage and current to the voltage waveform sensed by the ADS131M04.  In addition, it covers the TPS7A78-based cap-drop power supply used in this design.
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