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191 Results
LC-sensing solution with TI FemtoFET and CC1350 Sensor Controller Engine

In-system tunable Multiband Sub-1GHz RF sub-system

Multiband Sub-1GHz RF sub-systems

LC-sensing solution with TI FemtoFET and CC1350 Sensor Controller Engine

Bidirectional InfraRed PHY communication with a single IR LED

Some EU standards like EN1434-3 for heat meters require optical interface as per EN62056-21, where two separate IR LEDs are used (one for receive and one for transmit direction). TIDA-01212 shows an alternative approach, which uses a single IR LED to implement a bi-directional IrDA PHY link with 9.6 kbps in half-duplex mode. The design approach can  the system reduce cost of any smart (sub-)metering device by replacing the legacy optical IrDA PHY modules with two separate LEDs.

LC-sensing solution with TI FemtoFET and CC1350 Sensor Controller Engine

7-segment LCD control thru SW and GPIOs

This module covers the “Innovative 7-Segment LCD Control Using GPIO Pins and SW” section of the “Single-chip Smart Water meter with Dual-band RF link and InfraRed port” training series.

Current sensor and metrology architecture options

This section compares two types of current sensors used in electricity meters: current transformers and shunts.  In addition, it discusses three different architectures for sensing the voltage and current samples used to calculate the metrology parameters.  These architectures include a SoC-based architecture, AFE-based architecture, and ADC-based architecture.

Introduction to TIDA-010037 reference design

This section provides an overview of the TIDA-010037 reference design, which uses the ADS131M04 delta sigma standalone ADC for sensing the voltage and current necessary to calculate metrology parameters.  The TIDA-010037 design targets Class 0.1 split-phase current transformer meters.

TIDA-010037 hardware design

This section provides an overview of the hardware used in the TIDA-010037 design, which includes information on the eFuse circuit used to create a current limited rail for connection to an external communication module.  In addition, this section discusses the circuits used to translate the Mains voltage and current to the voltage waveform sensed by the ADS131M04.

Designing software for split-phase electricity meters that use standalone ADCs

This section covers the initialization code and algorithms that can be used to calculate metrology parameters in a split-phase system using the sensed voltage and current samples

Calibration and metrology accuracy results

This section discusses the procedure used to calibrate the TIDA-010037 design and the results obtained with this design.

Summary

In this section, a summary of the entire “How to design high-accuracy CT-based split-phase electricity meters using standalone metrology ADCs” training module would be covered.  Links will be provided for the reference designs that were discussed during this training series.

Current sensor and metrology architecture options

This section compares two types of current sensors used in electricity meters: current transformers and shunts.  In addition, it discusses three different architectures for sensing the voltage and current samples used to calculate the metrology parameters.  These architectures include a SoC-based architecture, AFE-based architecture, and ADC-based architecture.

Introduction to TIDA-010036 reference design

This section provide an overview of the TIDA-010036 reference design, which uses the ADS131M04 delta sigma standalone ADC for sensing the voltage and current necessary to calculate metrology parameters.  The TIDA-010036 design targets Class 0.5 single-phase two-wire meters with shunt current sensors and has a compact, magnetically immune cap-drop power supply to power the design from AC mains.

TIDA-010036 hardware design

This section provides an overview of the hardware used in the TIDA-010036 design, which includes the circuits used to translate the Mains voltage and current to the voltage waveform sensed by the ADS131M04.  In addition, it covers the TPS7A78-based cap-drop power supply used in this design.

Designing software for 1-phase electricity meters that use standalone ADCs

This section covers the initialization code and algorithms that can be used to calculate metrology parameters in a single-phase system using the sensed voltage and current samples.

ADS131M04 current detection mode for detecting neutral removal tampering

This section discusses current detection mode, which is a special low-power mode of the ADS131M04 standalone ADC, that can detect the presence of current when someone has tampered with a meter by removing its neutral connection.

Calibration and metrology accuracy results

This section discusses the procedure used to calibrate the TIDA-010037 design and the results obtained with this design.

Summary

In this section, a summary of the entire “How to design 1-phase shunt electricity meters using standalone metrology ADCs” training module would be covered.  Links will be provided for the reference designs that were discussed during this training series.

Universal data concentrator supports Ethernet, 6LoWPAN RF mesh and more

IPv6-based communications are becoming the standard choice in industrial markets such as smart meters and grid automation. The universal data concentrator design provides a complete IPv6-based network solution integrated with Ethernet backbone communication, 6LoWPAN mesh networking and more. The 6LoWPAN mesh networking, which adopts an identical layering architecture to the WI-SUN FAN, addresses key concerns such as standards-based interoperability, reliability, security and long-distance connectivity.

Anti-tamper Techniques to Thwart Attacks on Smart Meters

Non-technical losses (“theft”) account for billions of dollars of revenue loss for utility providers around the world as individuals are able to hack meters to slow or stop the accumulation of energy usage statistics. This loss has driven increased requirements for enhancing the protection designed into new smart meters.  This training session will discuss different methods of attacking smart meters and how TI’s analog portfolio can be used to detect or even prevent these attacks. In one scenario magnets are used to saturate any transformers present in the system.

Detecting case tamper attacks using inductive switches

The first line of defense against tampering by bypassing current, reversing connections, and disconnecting leads is the meter case. Due to this, it is common for utilities to require some form of intrusion detection system to detect when someone opens a case.  In this section, we will cover how to detect someone trying to open the case of a meter.

Detecting magnetic tampering using hall-effect sensors

For anti-tampering, it is common to try to detect the presence of a strong magnet. In this section, we will cover the use of hall sensors for low-power detection of strong magnetic fields in three dimensions.  Details on our magnetic tamper detection reference design, TIDA-00839, will be provided as well as some of the design considerations that were kept in mind when creating this reference design.  

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